Autumn Moon-Song

Autumn Moon-Song

Song of the Moon Fairy
Chang’e , Chinese goddess of the Moon

Fingers flex, shaping the notes on taut strings

curving them nimbly across their silken lengths

bending into the rounded shape of the lute’s body

leaning, plucking faster in anticipation of celebration

sounds vibrating gently through the air, floating upwards.

From her ethereal home in the clouds, the Moon Goddess listens

sweet, round mooncakes and bejeweled pastries lay upon an altar

awaiting her to bless the people gathered below.

Gracefully, she flies down to earth

bestowing eternal beauty upon her worshippers

as the lute musicians fingers nimbly play a skillful tune

announcing her like the light of colourful, glowing lanterns

floating in the sky amongst the clouds

under the dazzling light of the Autumn Moon.

Copyright October 9, 2017 Stacie Eirich

Originally posted September 1, 2016 


The Mid-Autumn Moon Festival (or Harvest Festival) is an ancient festival that is still celebrated in China today, paying homage to Chang’e, mythological Goddess of the Moon. Read more about the festival and Chang’e’s tale here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-Autumn_Festival

Below is a video mix of both technically & stylistically beautiful Ruan music — particularly “Sleeping Lily” and “Folk Song.” The Ruan is a Chinese string instrument, a modern form of the Lute/Moon Guitar. Soloist Gao Huiru plays a medium sized Ruan here — a tenor Zhongruan with string tuning: G2-D3-G3-D4.

Today’s poem is written in response to a wonderful article and writing prompt @Toads: Artistic Interpretations with Margaret – The Mets Musical Instruments Exhibit  I hope you’ll have time to enjoy her article and listen to some of the beautiful instruments & read their fascinating histories. Thank you Margaret for such lovely inspiration! 🙂

Thank you for visiting Space to Dream! Have a musical day.

Stretching my Heart: Musings on Writing & Music

Lately, I’ve been kept awake at night with thoughts about how music and writing, songs & poetry – my life as both performer and writer, singer & poet – intersect. Also, how polar opposite they can be at times. How in both arts I’m constantly auditioning and re-auditioning, re-assessing, re-visioning – sometimes wondering why I do it. Especially at moments when I get (another) rejection, when I feel like family or friends don’t understand. When I’m just plain tired.

Passion. Love. A feeling in my bones that this is what I do best, this is what I was made for. That’s why I keep writing and singing.

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Because nothing else fills the void, holds me fast and captures me – like an electricity running through me all the way past the tips of my fingers. A calm sea washing over me. Both can have the effect of becoming lost within the song or story on the page, far from my self. Digging deep into how my mind and body work to create sound and thought. Both can be solitary arts in practice, and intensely personal. When shared, they become full of public eyes and scrutiny, people telling what they liked or disliked, approving or rejecting your art. What is important is to get past the feeling of being rejected yourself.

But can you ever really separate your self from the art you create? There is a part of me inside each song I sing, poem and story I write – such is the risk we take as artists. It is also what makes it so fulfilling, that our songs and stories exist within ourselves and by sharing them, we are revealing our souls.

Can we separate our selves from our art? I still struggle with this, even after 20+ years of auditioning, performing, writing, editing, revising…the process is never-ending.
And so is my heart, stretched across each word, each breath, each noun phrase and legato line. With every poem and song I release a part of my self, my soul – hoping it shimmers with light. Willing it to be beautiful, to be meaningful, to be true.

Copyright September 18, 2017 Stacie Eirich 

Originally posted June 10 2016  


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